Overview & History

  • Elizabeth Cobb Middle School has a rich tradition and history enjoyed by students and the community alike. Nestled in the heart of Tallahassee, our campus is located just a few blocks from downtown Tallahassee and the capital building. The school is named for Miss Elizabeth Cobb, who served Leon County Schools for many years. She began teaching in 1915 and taught both elementary and high school in Leon County. She became principal of Caroline Brevard School in 1931, and supervisor of Leon County Schools in 1935, the year she retired. Miss Elizabeth Cobb died in 1974 at the age of 96.

    Elizabeth Cobb Middle School was the first Leon County public junior high/middle school. In the years of 1952-1954, the main building was constructed. Additional constructions includes; the gymnasium in 1985, the media center, a classroom wing (Hillcrest Street), science labs, and the administrative wing completed in 1992.  The most recent changes include addition of the Chorus building and the new front office and Media Center renovations completed in the summer of 2014.

    Cobb has achieved academic excellence for more than fifty years by adapting its educational programs and student services to meet the ever-changing needs of the community. The school's leaders and faculty continuously implement various initiatives and programs to meet the multiple demands of our student enrollment. Since 2001, Cobb has been a "School of Choice" for the Applied Science and Technology Magnet Program, offering a rigorous curriculum for students interested in the sciences. In addition to our intensive academic programs, which allows for more individualized instruction, and gifted curriculum, Cobb also offers high school courses in, science, mathematics, foreign languages, and performing arts.

    Cobb Middle School's average enrollment is around 850 students . According to the 2013 student demographic data, Cobb's student population is, 52.1 percent African American, 37.7 percent White, 4.7 percent Hispanic, 1.6 percent Asian, and 3.5 percent multi-racial. Forty-Nine percent of our students are eligible to receive a free or reduced lunch.